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Hezekiah Butterworth
Little Sky-High

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Little Sky-High The Surprising Doings of Washee-Washee-Wang


E-text prepared by David Garcia and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team (pgdp/) from page images generously made available by the Kentuckiana Digital Library (kdl.kyvl.org/)


LITTLE SKY-HIGH


Or The Surprising Doings of Washee-Washee-Wang


by


HEZEKIAH BUTTERWORTH


Author of "In the Days of Jefferson," "The Bordentown Story-Tellers," "Little Arthur's History of Rome," "The Schoolhouse on the Columbia"


[Illustration]


* * * * *


The "Nine to Twelve" Series


===========================


LITTLE DICK'S SON.


Kate Gannett Wells.


MARCIA AND THE MAJOR.


J. L. Harbour.


THE CHILDREN OF THE VALLEY.


Harriet Prescott Spofford.


HOW DEXTER PAID HIS WAY.


Kate Upson Clark.


THE FLATIRON AND THE RED CLOAK.


Abby Morton Diaz.


IN THE POVERTY YEAR.


Marian Douglas.


LITTLE SKY-HIGH.


Hezekiah Butterworth.


THE LITTLE CAVE-DWELLERS.


Ella Farman Pratt.


===========================


Thomas D. Crowell &Co.


New York.


* * * * *


[Illustration: "IT OPENED A GREAT MOUTH, AND SMOKE SEEMED TO ISSUE FROM IT." Page 41.]


New York: Thomas Y. Crowell &Co. Publishers Copyright, 1901 By T. Y. Crowell &Co. Typography by C. J. Peters &Son. Boston, U. S. A.


NOTE.


The story of Sky-High is partly founded on a true incident of a young


Chinese nobleman's education, and is written to illustrate the happy


relations that might exist between the children of different countries,


if each child treated all other good children like "wangs."


28 Worcester Street, Boston.


March 22, 1901.


LITTLE SKY-HIGH.



<p>I. BELOW STAIRS.</p><br />

The children came home from school-Charles and Lucy.


"I have a surprise for you in the kitchen," said their mother, Mrs. Van Buren. "No, take off your things first, then you may go down and see. Now don't laugh-a laugh that hurts anyone's feelings is so unkind-tip-toe too! No, Charlie, one at a time; let Lucy go first."


Lucy tip-toed with eyes full of wonder to the dark banister-stairs that led down to the quarters below. Her light feet were as still as a little mouse's in a cheese closet. Presently she came back with dancing eyes.


"Oh, mother! where did you get him? His eyes are like two almonds, and his braided hair dangles away down almost to the floor, and there are black silk tassels on the end of it, and kitty is playing with them; and when Norah caught my eye she bent over double to laugh, but he kept right on shelling peas. Charlie, come and see; let me go with Charlie, mother?"


Charlie followed Lucy, tip-toeing to the foot of the banister, where a platform-stair commanded a view of the kitchen.


Pages:


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